Sizzling Summer Spree!

In case you don’t know firsthand, the Summer Spree was a huge success, the quintessential Summer Afternoon in the Park. And the Astronaut Training was a delightful addition.

Astronauts of tomorrow

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to the Management Committee: Ron Senkus, Sonja O’Sullivan, Iris White, Sandra Bauer, Paul Buckley, Alan Deacon and Andy King. They pulled out all the stops and made the event happen in style.

All of us would like to thank the members of FSP (and their tireless  friends and families) who delivered leaflets, baked, took photos for the competition, suggested ideas, put up gazebos, dragged chairs and tables and boxes around, ran errands, ran stalls, served endless thirsty people and spread their cheerfulness in what was a truly neighbourhood event.

Continue reading Sizzling Summer Spree!

Tour the Allotments during the Summer Spree 12-5:30pm

You may not know but the extensive allotments at the edge of the Park have always been a substantial portion of Shrewsbury Park. On Sunday during the Summer Spree allotmenteers are offering tours of the plots and plenty of advice about growing your own.

Turn up at the Allotment gate at the end of Rowton Road or check at the FSP Membership stall at the Festival for directions.

Habitats Walk: Shrewsbury Park and Woodlands Farm Sunday 24 June 1 – 3.30pm

FSP and Woodlands Farm have collaborated to offer a relaxing ramble through these two diverse green spaces. It will be a  meandering walk discovering varied habitats, plants, wildlife and atmospheres.

Walk begins at the car park entrance to Shrewsbury Park on Plum Lane and includes the woods, Dothill allotments and nature reserve. We then follow Barry Gray through the Dothill gate to Woodlands Farm taking in more woods, hedgerows and the hay meadows in full bloom.  Endpoint is the café with refreshments available! You can retrace the route to the Park or take the 89 or 486 bus back up the hill.

Cost: £2 – Children up to 16 go free.  We will be walking through fields containing ewes and lambs, so sorry, NO DOGS allowed on this walk.

Wear sturdy shoes and clothes for the weather on the day. Any questions about accessibility etc. please contact werfs@gmail.com

Sign your kids up for Ready, Steady, Lift Off! at the Spree on Sunday 8 July

“What an amazing idea! At Last something exciting and fun!”

(Timeout)

DATE: Sunday 8th July

PERFORMANCE TIMES: 12.30pm, 2.00pm, 4.00pm

 SHOW INFO

Welcome to our Space Station! Train to be an astronaut, make your own rocket, colour and LIFT OFF! Ready Steady Lift Off! is an immersive theatre show for 3-8 year olds and their families combining live performance, music, storytelling and painting into one interactive theatre show.

Ready Steady Lift Off! invites you the audience to take part in our colourful astronaut programme. Come and navigate, sing, colour and play your way through the 7 stages of training, from working as a team in a space station to piloting your own rocket around our galaxy.

This immersive experience will get the family colouring and creating together, and once you’ve decorated your rocket, you will orbit around space meeting strange creatures and overcoming some cosmic catastrophes, all in a days work for the LIFT OFF team! Finally fly your rocket home!

BOOKING

Shows are FREE but booking is essential. The show is for children aged 3 – 8 (strictly no under 3’s allowed) and all children must be supervised by a parent/guardian. To book please follow the below link…

https://eea.org.uk/whats-on/events/ready-steady-lift-off-summer-spree

For more information, or to book, please contact ross.bolwell@eea.org.uk | 020 8853 4809

Want to receive updates on events?

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required










Bee-autiful day for a Pollen Walk

The weather gods were smiling on Sunday 13 May, as we gathered in the park to look at bee behaviour around the blossoming flowers, ably guided by local Apiarist, John Large.

The idea was to mark some foraging honey bees, with a view to finding them in the apiary hives later, but the bees proved (mainly) elusive.

Walking through Shrewsbury Park – May 2018

We then departed for Oxleas Wood Apiary, where after a short, but informative talk, beekeeping suits and gauntlets were passed round, preparing us to get up close and personal with the bees.

Opening up the hives identifying the Queens, and seeing the way the pollen, nectar, honey and bee larvae were stored was a real eye-opener.

Later on, we even got a chance to taste the amazing honey – a great day with a very sweet ending!

More photos here

Thanks go to John Large – find out more about his Beekeeping courses and Apiary Days now.

Foraging Walk a delicious success!

If you’ve ever wondered how you’d survive if you were stranded in the woods over a weekend, our local foraging expert, Kevin Godby is the man to ask.

On Sunday 6 May, 26 residents gathered, eager to learn more about foraging. Amongst the edible plants were, black mustard, nettles, ground elder and ash keys (samples of which Kevin had pickled last year). See a list of our Foraging_Finds

As the group munched their way through the park, he talked about how the first communities would have used foraging to supplement their diets, eating small amounts from each plant. It is an important thing to note, as this would stop any digestion problems from eating too much of a particular plant.

Kevin works for Greenwich Co-operative Development Agency, delivering the Growing Greenwich project at 5 locations in Greenwich Borough. It allows local residents to attend free, drop in gardening sessions and is part of the Good Food in Greenwich network.

To find out more about Growing Greenwich please contact:

Kevin Godby  on 020 8269 4880 or email Kevin on Kevin@gcda.org.uk

Update: Kevin has some recipe advice for fellow foragers:

The cherry plum jam I made had less sugar than ‘proper jam’ as it is kept in the fridge. To make it I squeezed out the stones as I worked through the pile of fruit and cooked in a preserving pan.

The hogweed omelette would have been tastier if I had ignored the poor advice online that says frying brings out the flavour. If I were doing it again, I would use a smaller amount of the youngest fresh leaves, chopped fine, perhaps steamed for a couple of minutes to soften, and stirred into the egg just before cooking.

I based my pickled ash keys on the parts of several recipes I liked the look of but this one is a decent starting point, the main thing is to boil them and discard the water a few times to remove the bitterness before making the vinegar. Use cider vinegar and brown sugar. I didn’t include ginger as I didn’t want it to overpower the other flavours. Some recipes add curry type spices which doesn’t appeal to me. The harvesting timing is crucial, they need to be quite small and not be at all stringy when tasted raw from the tree, but soon the bunches of keys will be hidden by the leaves until they suddenly become too big.

Link to recipe for Rowan Jelly (ignore the waffle that precedes the recipe, and can use ordinary apples instead of crab apples).

Enjoy!

Last call for the 2019 Calendar competition!

If you have been with us for more than a year, you’ll be aware that we run an annual photography competition for our members to find great images which appear in our calendar. Winners receive a copy of the calendar – and the glory of having their picture and name in print!

This year, we have had so much varied weather (and this weekend looks to be amazing) that we’re sure you have some super shots that you’ve captured in the park – so why not enter them? You can enter a maximum of 3 photographs.

Deadline for Entries

Entries will be judged at our Festival on Sunday 8 July – entries should be emailed to us along with your name!

Image quality & captioning

All photos entered need to be of good quality (typically at least 1mb in size). We’re printing it in square format so do make sure it will resize successfully.

Don’t forget a catchy caption to go with it!

Send the photos to werfsp@gmail.com by our deadline of midnight on 27 June 2018.

Shrewsbury Park Pollen Foraging Walk and Apiary Visit – Sunday 13 May

Sunday 13 May, meeting at Shrewsbury Park Car Park
(entrance on Plum Lane)
11am – 2pm
Ever wondered where honeybees gather their pollen to make nectar and then delicious honey? Or what the link is to local honey relieving the symptoms of hayfever?
Join us for a walk through Shrewsbury Park identifying which plants are in bloom and taking samples of pollen using tweezers and poly bags – also watching the honey bees foraging on the plants.
Afterwards, we have tickets for 10 lucky members to visit the Oxleas Apiary to see the bees in action – we might examine some microscopic slides of pollen samples too!
We can accommodate much more than 10 on the walk but only 10 at the Apiary session 
Children are welcome on the Park walk, but not at the Apiary session which is held at the Council’s depot, meaning it could be dangerous for them – also, no pet dogs please!
Here are some links that might be useful if you are thinking of joining us for the event – http://www.largeassociates.com/cz1000/QuestionsandAnswers/BeeCatcher.html
Access to the Apiary is from Kenilworth Gardens, into Crown Woods Lane, 1st right by Jack Wood Cottage, then 1st right again through the black gates (that may appear locked), into the depot yard and congregate near the parked YELLOW council lorries.
Finally, please read the Oxleas Wood Apiary Risk Assessment and for the visit wear a stout or preferably toe protected footwear and try to avoid using heavily scented soaps or perfume, as it can trigger hostility in the bees – more information on Health and Safety issues, bee stings, and Do’s and Don’ts when in the Apiary are available HERE: http://www.largeassociates.com/cz1000/YourPastQuestions.htm
Want to know how to book the Apiary session? just click through and register for free: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/pollen-foraging-walk-tickets-45129025129 
p.s. if you would like to make up some pollen microscope slides in advance then we could view these through a microscope during the visit.

Formed in 2006, the Friends of Shrewsbury Park encourage the use of Shrewsbury Park and support the development of facilities for recreation, education and amenities for local people and to encourage a sense of community around the park.